Jun 292012
 

I have a real addiction to creating knitting charts. It’s an obsession really. I literally dream of little squares, stitches, and pixels.


I have so many other things I should be working on right now, but instead I’m drawing charts for a brand new pattern.  Those of you who like stranded knitting will have lots to look forward to this fall!

 June 29, 2012  knitting Tagged with: , ,  No Responses »
Jun 222012
 


Jane is at the top of my list of internet friends who I’d love to meet in person.  It feels weird to me that we never have since we’ve known each other for over 6 years and shared a lot of ups and downs.  I adore her writing and dry sense of humor as well as her crazy creativity.  One main tether between us over the years has been knitting.  I love it when I find another knitter who constantly blows my mind.  Jane’s Womb With a View still has me shaking my head years later as to how this was ever dreamt up.  Amazing.  I wanted to probe her brain for my blog and share her work with the rest of you.  She was ever so kind to oblige.

Wattsolak:  Why knitting??

Jane:  Knitting has this “link to the past” feeling that I love. I’ve always been kind of obsessed with what has gone before and what people did “once upon a time”, and I feel like it connects me with a simpler time. My grandma is one of those super-speed knitters that can probably knit in her sleep, and since I’ve been knitting she and I have really connected through that. That connection is so precious to me. I’m also a perpetual motion machine, and if I didn’t have knitting needles in my hand I’d probably be chewing my hand off just for something to do.
Wattsolak:  What’s your favorite knitting project thus far?Jane:  I loved making my stranded yoke sweater. The EZ formula is so magical, so personal, so mathematical. It’s astounding that you can punch in a few numbers and do a little math, and as long as you trust those numbers, you have a perfectly fitted garment at the end. Every time I found myself doubting the “pithy instructions”, I would just ignore the doubt and keep going. When I was finally done, I was in awe of how perfect it was.

Wattsolak:  What is your favorite source of inspiration?

Jane:  Is it bad that my answer isn’t “my children”? It’s totally not my children. I like things that are dark and scary, so I’m always trying to find a way to make something darker and scarier. Like “Hmm, that yarn is the colour of zombie flesh” or “That colourway looks just like a placenta” – those are things I’ve actually thought and then gone on to start experimenting. I’m not really very good at designing things, but I do love to mess around with a pattern and change it to suit me, even if it’s just with colour.


Wattsolak: What other crafty things do you do besides knitting?

Jane:  Nothing. Knitting is it for me. I actually find myself hating other crafts because they don’t measure up. I think scrapbooking is for the weak, and I can’t sew to save my life. Sometimes I try to garden, and then things die. But it’s fun while my hands are in the mud, so I guess that counts for something.

Wattsolak:  What is your ultimate knitting project/goal?

Jane:  My ultimate goal is to finish the sweater I started for Dillon [Jane's husband] 2 years ago. At one point I was making some serious progress, and I finished the back panel and got so excited that I draped it over him to see if the sizing was way off. And he jumped up and screamed “IT ITCHES! IT ITCHES!”  Well obviously, Sherlock. It’s Lopi. Anyway, I haven’t had the heart to pick it up since then. And that was 9 months ago. Someday I’m going to overcome the trauma and pick it up again.  I also really wish I could design stuff, but my brain just doesn’t work that way. I’ve improvised many times, but I go into a bit of a trance when I do that and can’t remember what I’ve done when it’s all over, so I can’t turn those things into patterns.

Wattsolak:  Exactly how much coffee do you drink in a day?

Jane:  Ha! Well… we make a 12 cup Bodum in the morning, and Dillon takes about 2 cups of that to work with him. I go through the rest during the course of the day, and sometimes make another pot. So A LOT. It doesn’t even affect me physically anymore. I need it to live but it doesn’t keep me up unless I forget to eat. But coffee and knitting go together so beautifully! How can I not drink it?

Wattoslak:  Seriously, those non-coffee-drinking knitters are ones to be suspicious of.

 


Thanks, Jane, you rock.  If anyone wants to see more of Jane’s amazingness, check her out on Ravelry!
Jun 072012
 

Finally, a reptile in the Wattsolak collection!  I’m so happy to share this alligator.  Or crocodile.  I still haven’t fully decided what she is.  Does it matter?  They both give me the heebie jeebies.  The zoo in Denver has an exhibit with cute little tropical animals and some reptiles, plus a really great old sea turtle.  Then you turn a corner and – BAM! – you’re face to face with an alligator behind seemingly-not-strong-enough plexiglass.  My fight or flight instinct always pipes in and tells me it’s a really stupid thing to do to stand that close to a gator.

Mine is a little less intimating.  This one won’t spook you when you come around a corner in your darkened house.  I hope.

The pattern is written for worsted weight yarn but if you choose your needles wisely it could be done in any weight.  A tiny fingering one would be adorable!  Part of me really wants to knit one with worsted yarn doubled and size 13 needles for one the size of a true baby alligator.  Or crocodile.

The Details:

Yarn: Worsted weight yarn,
   shown here in Fancy Tiger
   Heirloom
Yardage: 250yds/227m green,
   40yds/36m contrast color for
   stripes, 15yds/13.5m white
   yarn for teeth, 5yds/4.5m
   black for eyes
Gauge: 21sts and 26rows =
   4 inches / 10cm in
   stockinette stitch
Suggested needle size:
   US size 6 / 4mm
Finished measurements:
   approximately 24″ long
Price: $5

Find this pattern on Ravelry